Just as Memorial Day marks the beginning of summer and Americans take time to relax and be with family as well as to remember those lost in battles, the Fourth of July may bring out American’s patriotism.   But it’s still a holiday. And Americans in the latest Economist/YouGov Poll will spend the day with family, at home, doing chores and watching television. 

Only 9% will attend a parade or other local event, and just 13% will watch a professional fireworks dis.  9% will set off their own fireworks (perhaps breaking local ordinances in the process). Only one in four of those setting off their own explosions will also see a professional display.  Half of those have a get-together with their family (29% of all adults) will also have a barbeque.

The public’s assessment of American patriotism (as well as their own) reflects the fact that the Fourth of July is a day people celebrate as a summer holiday (though the President’s plans for a special celebration on the National Mall could impact that).   Nearly half believe the country is becoming less patriotic, with Republicans especially likely to think that. 

But that is a belief Americans have held for a while (in 2018 the distribution of opinion was much the same).  Only four in ten think of themselves as very patriotic.   Republicans (and those 65 and older) are far more likely than Democrats and those under 30 to think of themselves that way.  

The level of self-reported patriotism among those under 30 has increased slightly since 2018, but fewer of those 65 and older call themselves very patriotic now than did a year ago. 

While President Trump will be celebrating at the Mall, Americans aren’t likely to describe him as “patriotic.”  Just 16% say they would use the word “patriotic” to describe the President, while 36% would not. Nearly half the country isn’t sure whether the word describes him or doesn’t.

See full toplines and tables results here. 

Image: Getty

 

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