CBS News/YouGov: What Americans think President Trump is getting right and wrong during COVID-19

Linley SandersData Journalist
April 14, 2020, 3:45 PM UTC

This poll is a part of the CBS/YouGov Poll partnership and was cited in the CBS News article “Views of Trump's handling of coronavirus outbreak slip again.”

Americans increasingly disapprove of how President Donald Trump has handled the COVID-19 outbreak, according to a CBS News/YouGov survey. It is the first time in this survey that more Americans say Trump is doing a bad job, rather than a good one.

Among the slight majority of Americans (52%) who believe Trump is doing a bad job handling the coronavirus outbreak, there is consensus as to why. Most of these individuals (86%) say a big reason for their disapproval is that the states and doctors do not have resources to fight the coronavirus.

Other significant reasons include that this group does not trust Trump’s judgment (82%) and does not believe the number of positive COVID-19 cases is being contained (74%).

Among the Americans (47%) who believe Trump is doing a good job handling the COVID-19 outbreak, they perceive the opposite. A majority within this group (56%) say that a big reason for their approval is that states and doctors do have vital resources. Most (54%) are also glad for his daily press conferences, trust his judgment (54%), and believe that the number of positive COVID-19 cases is being contained.

Americans appear to view Trump’s judgment in handling the COVID-19 outbreak through a partisan lens, according to a CBS analysis. Republicans, who believe Trump is doing a good job, cited trust in his judgment as the top reason for their approval. In contrast, Democrats do not trust Trump’s judgment and tend to believe he is doing a bad job.

See the toplines and tables from this CBS News/YouGov Poll

Methodology: This CBS News survey was conducted by YouGov using a nationally representative sample of 2,025 US residents interviewed between April 7-9, 2020. This sample was weighted according to gender, age, race and education based on the American Community Survey, conducted by the US Bureau of the Census, as well as 2016 presidential vote, and registration status. The margin of error is +/- 2.6 points.

Image: Getty