Data Journalist

Black men and Hispanic men think it’s a comparably dangerous time for women and men

White men are more likely to say that it is a dangerous time to be a man than a woman in America, according to a YouGov RealTime poll of nearly 4,000 US adults.

Nearly four in ten (37%) white men agree with the statement that “it is a dangerous time to be a man in America.” By comparison, 32% of Caucasian men agree “it is a dangerous time to be a woman” in the US.

YouGov’s data shows that white men are the only racial group surveyed who rank the risk of being a man higher than they rank the risk of being a woman. White males expressed disagreement for the statements about men and women at equal rates (39%), but they were the most likely racial group to disagree that it’s a dangerous time to be a woman in America.

Both black men (40% to 41%) and Hispanic men (30% to 31%) say it is comparably dangerous to be a man or woman in America.

37% of white men say it's a dangerous time to be a man in America, compared to 32% who say the same about being a woman in America

In contrast, women across all races believe it is more dangerous to be a woman than a man in America. The research shows they do so by similar margins — with white women (27% to 41%), Black women (34% to 46%) and Hispanic women (25% to 38%) all more likely to agree that it is more dangerous to be a woman than a man.

White women carried the largest gap (14 percentage points) on agreeing that it’s more dangerous to be a woman than a man in America, followed by Hispanic women (13 points) and black women (12 points).

White men are also more likely to disagree with the statement, “It is a dangerous time to be a woman in America.” Nearly four in ten (39%) disagree that it is a dangerous time to be female, the same proportion (39%) who disagree that it’s a dangerous time to be a male in the US.

Overall, younger Americans are more likely than older generations to believe it is a dangerous time to be a woman in the US. More millennials (45%) think this than Gen Xers (38%), baby boomers (31%), or members of the Silent Generation (28%).

Older generations were also more likely to register disagreement with the statement. Four in ten (40%) Americans in the Silent Generation disagreed, as did 37% of baby boomers, 32% of Gen Xers, and about a quarter (26%) of Millennials.

Related: One in three men say males are disadvantaged by gender diversity efforts in the workplace

See the full YouGov results from this poll here and learn more about YouGov RealTime polling.

YouGov Methodology: Total unweighted sample size was 3,928 US adults aged 18+, including 2,202 females and 1,726 males. There were 1,192 white males included in the survey and 1,405 white females. The responding sample is weighted to the profile of the sample definition to provide a representative reporting sample. Interviews were conducted online between April 9 - 17, 2019.

Image: Getty

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