Head of Omnibus, US

Most Americans think that herbal supplements can improve health.

68% believe that they can be effective health supplements compared to 44% who believe that they can cause harm.  58% of Americans, however, believe that herbal remedies should only be taken after seeking medical advice. 

YouGov Omnibus Research Herbal Remedies

Although a third (33%) of adults taking herbal remedies spoke to their doctors before taking the remedies, a slightly higher number (35%) chose to check in with their friends or family.  Nearly half of people who take herbal supplements (48%) researched online articles before taking them and 31% checked online reviews.  

19% of people taking herbal remedies, take them because they were recommended by their doctor, a similar number as those who take them because they were recommended by friends and family (22%).

Just under a quarter (24%) of Americans had heard about a recent ruling that required major retailers to remove health supplements from their shelves. 

The New York Attorney General ordered several major retailers to remove supplements after finding that only a fifth of the products tested contained the plants listed on the labels.  32% of supplement users said that the Attorney General’s concerns makes them want to reduce the number of supplements that they are taking.

Herbal supplements are still a relatively small element of the healthcare market; although 17% of Americans take herbal supplements daily, and 30% take them a few times a month and more, this compares to 46% of adult Americans who are taking vitamins daily. Just over half  (52%) of Americans take some form of prescription medication on a daily basis.

The most frequently used herbal remedies are green tea, garlic, Flaxseed and Cranberry.

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Image courtesy of Press Association





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