Women are more likely than men to have been the one to end a long-term romantic relationship

The up and downs of celebrity couples are the bread and butter of tabloids, gossip magazines and much of daytime television. Celebrity breakups attract more attention than those of ordinary Americans, but the fundamental experience of heartbreak and the parting of ways is a common one. 

YouGov's latest research shows that a large majority of Americans (64%) have themselves gone through the breakup of a long-term relationship. Only 23% of Americans have not. This may be an indication of changing times as people over the age of 65 (41%) are the most likely to say that they have never had a long-term relationship end. 

Among people who have experienced a breakup, most have been on both sides of the equation. 70% have been the one to end the relationship, while 75% say that they have had a partner end a relationship with them. Women (30%) are more than twice as likely as men (12%) to say, however, that they have never been broken up with. Similarly, men (33%) are almost twice as likely as women (17%) to say that they have never been the one to end the relationship. Majorities of both men and women have been in both situations, however. 

Many people who have had a relationship end also say that they have had a relationship end on mutual terms, where both partners decided that the relationship was over. 44% of people who have had a long-term relationship end say that they have experienced this while 46% say that they have not. 

Post-Breakup

When it comes to dealing with the fallout of a breakup, opinion is divided between people who think it is better to cut contact with former partners (37%) and people who think it's best to try and remain on good terms (40%). There is a notable age divide on the question, between people under the age of 30 and people aged 30 or more. Most under-30s (54%) say that it's better to go 'no contact' with exes and only 28% think it's best to try and remain on good terms. Among every other group, however, people narrowly tend to say that it's better to remain on good terms. 

Full poll results can be found here and topline results and margin of error here.

Quick answers to all of your questions

Contact us now to reach a nationally representative sample or a wide variety of special respondent groups.

More about Omnibus
Related Content